HELPING YOUNG PEOPLE BUILD A FUTURE OF THEIR OWN CHOOSING

HOMELESS

Having no where to go to sleep tonight is one of the most isolating and lonely experiences you’ll ever face.

If you have not already burnt all of your bridges wth family members and friends, sleeping on their sofas then they are among the first people you should ask for help.

  • Trust them. Explain what’s gone wrong and ask for their help.
  • Be honest with them and manage their expectations of how long you need a bed for. Make that six nights so that they know their help isn’t open ended. They are not heartless but you’re asking a big favour of them so accept short term help and get yourself motivated and out searching for help.
  • Set an alarm and get up in the morning by 8am. Then get down to your local council offices and ask to see the Housing Team. Be patient with them and wait for someone to offer you help. See your cool. Be polite at all times. Be honest. Explain your predicament and explain that you have no where to sleep tonight.

 

City YMCA London do not have emergency beds that we can offer you but there are organisations out their that do. Here’s where to start:

  • London Borough of Islington: Contact the Housing Aid Team on 020 7527 2000
  • Safer Islington: contact Targeted Youth Support by email TYS@islington.gov.uk or telephone 020 7527 2600
  • Alone in London: Visit www.aloneinlondon.org or call 0207 278 4224
  • No Second Night Out: Contact the 24/7 helpline on 0870 383 3333 or visit the website www.nosecondnightout.org.uk  
  • Streetlink: Call 0300 500 0914 or go to their website www.streetlink.org.uk

 

 

Rough sleeping in Islington

If you are concerned about someone sleeping rough in Islington, you can contact StreetLink who can connect the rough sleeper to the local support and services they need.   

Should I ask people about their situation?

There is no need to approach someone you don’t know to ask them about their situation. This is the job of local services.

What about people I have seen sleeping rough for a long time?

Some people may have a longer history of rough sleeping, be known to local services and may require longer term support to help them leave the streets. This can include people who suffer with mental health issues.

What if I know someone who is homeless but they are not sleeping rough?

Rough sleeping is the most visible sign of homelessness.  Other people who find themselves homeless can contact the council's Housing Aid Team

What about people who are on the street but who may not be rough sleeping?

Some people who appear to be sleeping rough may be engaged in street activities, such as drinking or begging, but in fact have somewhere to stay.  You can still alert StreetLink as it is always better to get in touch about someone you think may be rough sleeping, so that local services can provide support if needed.

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